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About Last Night
TERRY TEACHOUT on the arts in New York City
(with additional dialogue by OUR GIRL IN CHICAGO)



    OCTOBER

    "Terry Teachout, author of 'All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine,' 'A Terry Teachout Reader' and 'The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken,' started writing 'Second City,' a monthly column about the arts in New York, in the fall of 1999. In September, after six years and 64 columns, he filed his final report for The Post. 'I can't even begin to tell you how much I'll miss Second City,' he says. 'Not only was it a pleasure and a privilege to report to the readers of one great city about the artistic doings of another, but I learned to love Washington along the way.'...


    "Second City," Washington Post, Oct. 2, 2005. A final farewell.GO TO THE STORY

    SEPTEMBER

    "It's profoundly unsettling for a Manhattanite to be following the news these days. I've found it all but impossible to tear myself away from the televised scenes of mounting chaos in New Orleans and on the Gulf Coast, though I did take a quick look the other day at the first 'Second City' column I filed after 9/11. It started like this: 'We're all right, thanks. It took a week or two for us to pull ourselves together, but New Yorkers have finally started to emerge from their holes, looking for all that art offers in times of trial: inspiration, diversion, catharsis, escape.' It will take a lot longer for the victims of Hurricane Katrina to reconstitute their lives, and longer still, I fear, for them to regain access to the solace of art..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, Sept. 4, 2005. The Irish Repertory Theatre, Primary Stages, Mark Morris at Mostly Mozart, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    AUGUST

    “Respighi is known in this country for 'The Fountains of Rome', 'The Pines of Rome' and not much else, but in Italy he's rightly admired as a witty, wonderfully lyrical composer. 'La Bella Dormente' is all that and more, and Basil Twist's magical staging commingles singers, puppets and puppeteers to tell the familiar tale (at the end they all dance together, in a breathtaking piece of theatrical wizardry). The puppets were bewitchingly characterful, the singers first-rate. How sad to think that this show received only a half-dozen performances! It belongs in an off-Broadway theater, where it would surely run until the end of time…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Aug. 7, 2005. Basil Twist, Merce Cunningham, and Yukio Mishima at the Lincoln Center Festival, plus Pilobolus, the Mint Theater Company, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JULY

    “Whenever visiting out-of-towners ask me to recommend a play, they usually have Broadway in mind. Alas, it isn't always possible for me to send them there with a clear conscience, but the good news is that I can now wholeheartedly recommend two Broadway shows, John Patrick Shanley's 'Doubt' and William Finn's 'The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,' both of which are guaranteed to give great pleasure without insulting the intelligence. The bad news (so to speak) is that both shows are selling out every performance. What to do? As any Second City theatergoer in good standing will gladly tell you, the really smart plays are to be found off-Broadway…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, July 3, 2005. Alan Ayckbourn, Ragtime, Jack Jones, Luciana Souza, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JUNE

    “Tenuously based on a wisp of plot lifted from Gene Kelly's 'American in Paris' film of 1951, Christopher Wheeldon's new ballet pulls out all the usual gay-Paree-ooh-la-la stops, deploying them with the self-assurance we have come to expect from the maker of 'Scènes de Ballet' and 'Carnival of the Animals.' So what's not to like? Only the fact that nobody onstage does anything even slightly unexpected. Nice decor by Adrienne Lobel and a nifty title-role performance from Damian Woetzel, but those of us who have been following Wheeldon from the beginning of his choreographic career know he can dig deeper than this…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, June 5, 2005. Christopher Wheeldon's An American in Paris, Austin Pendleton's Orson's Shadow, Gary Burton at Birdland, Edward Hopper at Peter Findlay Gallery, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    MAY

    “Accompanied by the slow movement of Schubert's E-flat Piano Trio, 'Rock of Ages' is one of those deceptively simple-looking Mark Morris dances whose unforced, understated beauty leaves you in breathless wonder when the curtain falls. The word 'masterpiece' has long since been devalued to the point of meaninglessness by overuse, but if 'Rock of Ages' isn't one, there's no such thing…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, May 1, 2005. Pat Metheny, Mark Morris, Doubt, Milton Avery, and more. GO TO THE STORY

    APRIL

    (In case you were wondering, I took the month of April off. "Second City" returns to the Sunday Washington Post on May 1.)

    GO TO THE STORY

    MARCH

    “Don't go getting smug on me, but I'm feeling a slight touch of envy. What did you Washingtonians get to see in February? American Ballet Theatre's all-Fokine program at the Kennedy Center and the unveiling of Helen Frankenthaler's sublime ‘Nature Abhors a Vacuum’ at the National Gallery, that's what. And what did we get to see up here in Second City? ‘The Gates: Central Park, New York, 1979-2005,’ otherwise known as 7,500 orange nylon sheets flapping in the wind…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Mar. 6, 2005. David Ostwald and Anat Cohen, Ethan Iverson, Diane Arbus, Beckett revivals, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    FEBRUARY

    “One of the perennial joys of following the arts in Second City is the unparalleled opportunity it gives me to watch promising artists become themselves. I've had an eye on Jessica Molaskey ever since she sang her first cabaret gig, so I knew what it meant when she made her debut in January at the Oak Room of the Algonquin Hotel—and blew the roof off…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Feb. 6, 2005. Jessica Molaskey, Nine Parts of Desire, Audra McDonald, Jane Freilicher, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JANUARY

    “I didn't expect wonders when I went to Lincoln Center to hear Hilary Hahn play the Elgar Violin Concerto with Sir Colin Davis and the New York Philharmonic—just a beautiful performance. Nor was it my idea to go in the first place, even though I'm one of Hahn's most ardent fans. I don't make it to all that many orchestral concerts nowadays, but a friend wanted to hear this one, so I got the tickets, showed up at Avery Fisher Hall in the pouring rain and settled into my seat, little knowing that I was to behold a miracle...”

    "Second City," Washington Post, Jan. 2, 2005. Hilary Hahn, Julia Dollison, The Rivals, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    DECEMBER

    “The cultural lives of most big cities are dominated by a handful of thousand-ton institutional gorillas, the fixed stars by which local art lovers navigate, sometimes cheering and sometimes grumbling. The trouble with too many of these well-heeled palaces of art is that when they call the tune, you usually have to dance or stay home. Not so in Second City. Sure, we have our own gorillas, but their power to call New York's cultural tune is sharply restricted by a lengthy list of competitors, large and small…”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Dec. 5, 2004. Milton Avery, Phil Woods, Woody Allen, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    NOVEMBER

    “Never mind the damn election. The most important art exhibit in Second City—maybe even in all of America—is the Giorgio Morandi show on display at Lucas Schoormans Gallery through Dec. 4. That's what I call news...”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Nov. 7, 2004. Giorgio Morandi, Laugh Whore, American Ballet Theatre at City Center, New York City Opera’s Dialogues of the Carmelites, Mary Foster Conklin sings Leiber and Stoller, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    OCTOBER

    “September is the expectant month. Limp from their summer vacations, art-loving Second Citians await the new season and fantasize about things to come, eagerly but not always lovingly. We're all delighted, for instance, that the Museum of Modern Art will be reopening on Nov. 20—but irked that it'll now cost $20 a head to get in. (The Met still costs $12, thank heavens.) Fortunately, the Great Art Machine didn't grind to a total halt between summer and fall, meaning that I was able to spend my usual share of nights on the town, chasing after pleasure….”

    “Second City,” Washington Post, Oct. 3, 2004. Mark O’Connor’s Hot Swing Trio, the Jazz Standard, The Bald Soprano, Kristin Chenoweth at Carnegie Hall, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    AUGUST

    "The Lincoln Center Festival has long since become a summertime fixture in Second City, but one too often noteworthy for the studied eccentricity of its self-consciously wide-ranging fare. Having had sharply critical things to say about the festival in the past, I'm happy—relieved, actually—to report that it's now striking a better artistic balance…"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Aug. 1, 2004. The Ashton Celebration, Much Ado About Nothing, Roger Kellaway and Bill Charlap, Joan Mitchell lithographs, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JULY

    "This is an anniversary of sorts—my 50th report from Second City. I'm not feeling especially nostalgic, though, so I'll skip the backward-looking rhapsodies and concentrate instead on something I've learned from writing this monthly column. The superabundance of New York, it seems, can turn even the most idealistic among us into tiresome perfectionists who expect everything to be ideal at all times. We forget that mixed bags also contain good stuff—and the bigger the bag, the more treats it can hold..."


    "Second City," Washington Post, July 4, 2004. Childe Hassam at the Met, Charlie Victor Romeo, Mark Morris and the Bad Plus, the JVC Jazz Festival, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JUNE

    "As the dormouse in ‘Alice in Wonderland’ observes, ‘Things are much of a muchness.’ That's what the cultural life of Second City is like—much of a muchness, so much so that it's sometimes too much so. On the other hand, what looks cool on paper often fails to pan out in person. Even the near-infallible Metropolitan Museum of Art has been known to slip a cog on occasion, a case in point being the recent opening of the Pierre and Maria-Gaetana Matisse Collection..."

    "Second City, Washington Post, June 6, 2004. The Matisse Collection, "Constable’s Skies," Kristin Chenoweth in Candide, Kyra Nichols in Liebeslieder Walzer, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    MAY

    "April in Second City is a bridge between seasons. The skies turn blue, the trees turn green, New York City Opera gives way to New York City Ballet, and every producer on Broadway tries to cram in as many opening nights as possible in preparation for the Tony Awards. As for me, I was longing for a little time off to smell the cherry blossoms. Instead, I've been going to four or five shows a week, which is not my idea of nothing to do...."

    "Second City," Washington Post, May 2, 2004. Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel, Jane Freilicher, Bill Charlap, John Pizzarelli and Jessica Molaskey, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    APRIL

    "I rarely lose sleep when I find myself at odds with the conventional wisdom, but quite a few musicians whose opinion I respect are fans of Brad Mehldau, a much- praised young pianist whose playing has always left me stone-cold. So when Jazz at Lincoln Center booked Mehldau for a week of solo recitals, I decided to give him another try and see whether my ears might have been on wrong. They weren't…"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Apr. 4, 2004. Brad Mehldau, Paul Taylor, Propeller’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    MARCH

    "Spring is here, or near, or one of those things, and curtains are going up all over Manhattan as if to compensate for the slew of closing notices posted at the end of the long, cold winter. Three Broadway shows, ‘Anna in the Tropics,’ ‘Never Gonna Dance’ and ‘The Retreat From Moscow,’ just took their last bows, and ‘Gypsy’ was on the verge of doing the same thing until its producers changed their minds at the last minute. I would have been perfectly happy to trade ‘Gypsy’ for ‘Anna,’ but the two other closings were no great loss, and in their place we now have a big-name Shakespeare production and a pair of new plays, all deserving of attention, albeit in differing degrees…"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Mar. 7, 2004. King Lear, Big Bill, New York City Ballet's Jewels, Maria Schneider, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    FEBRUARY

    "NYCB invited Broadway baby Susan Stroman ('Contact,' 'The Producers) to make 'Double Feature,' a full-evening ballet set to the songs of Irving Berlin and Walter Donaldson. You are perhaps wondering what the hell that has to do with Balanchine? Well, it seems that he spent a goodly chunk of the Thirties and Forties choreographing on Broadway and in Hollywood. Makes perfect sense, right? (Wrong.)..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, Feb. 1, 2004. New York City Ballet's Balanchine 100 festival, Bob Brookmeyer's New Art Orchestra, Mark Rothko at PaceWildenstein, Private Jokes, Public Places, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JANUARY

    "I'd been feeling slightly sour about life in Second City, having barely survived the usual pre-Christmas deadline scramble, and it occurred to me that it might be fun to dish up a year-end list of the Loudest Dogs of 2003. But as the lights of Manhattan twinkled outside the window of my jet, ‘Taboo,’ ‘Rose's Dilemma,’ ‘Urban Cowboy,’ ‘Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks’ and ‘The Look of Love’ suddenly seemed as stale as last month's stump speeches…"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Jan. 4, 2004. The best of New York in 2003.GO TO THE STORY

    DECEMBER

    "I want to know what possessed Mark Morris to give the local premiere of ‘All Fours,’ an unexpectedly angst-prone dance set to Bartók's raspingly dissonant Fourth String Quartet, anywhere but right here in Second City. I should have seen it at least twice, and I wish I hadn't had to go all the way to Newark to see it just once, because it was too complex and ambiguous to digest at a single sitting..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, Dec. 7, 2003. Mark Morris, La Juive at the Met, The Caretaker, "Sargent’s Women," the Lascivious Biddies, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    NOVEMBER

    "I always go to see American Ballet Theatre at the monstrous Metropolitan Opera House each spring, but I always have a better time when they move to the shabby-genteel, reasonably sized City Center…"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Nov. 2, 2003. Wesla Whitfield, ABT’s Pillar of Fire, Merce Cunningham, Alex Katz, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    OCTOBER

    "'Trumbo,'" at the Westside, is a repulsively sanctimonious two- man staged reading based on the letters of Dalton Trumbo..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, Oct. 5, 2003. "Trumbo," "The Thing About Men," Marvin Stamm, Bud Shank, Stacey Kent, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    SEPTEMBER

    "What does the fall season hold in store for Washingtonians planning a trip to Second City?..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, Sept. 5, 2003. A preview of New York's fall season.GO TO THE STORY

    AUGUST

    "It is with a certain reluctance that I proclaim the excellence of a museum whose galleries have heretofore been delightfully undercrowded …"

    "Second City," Washington Post, Aug. 3, 2003. The National Academy of Design, plus Maria Schneider, Julia Dollison, Kate McGarry, Raul Midon, Angelica Torn in Edge, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    JULY

    "Adelson Galleries outdid itself with a Maurice Prendergast retrospective..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, July 6, 2003. Maurice Prendergast at Adelson Galleries, Marsden Hartley at Berry-Hill Gallery, John Marin at Richard York Gallery, I Am My Own Wife, Sandy Stewart and Bill Charlap at the Algonquin Oak Room, and more.GO TO THE STORY
    JUNE

    "Christopher Wheeldon, one of the New Yorkers for whom I regularly root, is having a hot spring..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, June 1, 2003. Christopher Wheeldon's Carnival of the Animals at New York City Ballet, "Frankenthaler: New Paintings" at Knoedler & Company, Woody Allen's "Writer's Block,:" Hank Jones at Iridium, and more.GO TO THE STORY

    MAY

    "Symphonie Fantastique is a little crazy—a loony masterpiece that defies easy characterization..."

    "Second City," Washington Post, May 4, 2003. Basil Twist's Symphonie Fantastique at Lincoln Center, Jane Wilson at DC Moore Gallery, A Year with Frog and Toad, Osvaldo Golijov at Weill Recital Hall, New York City Opera's Rape of Lucretia, and more.GO TO THE STORY

ABOUT LAST NIGHT

ALN Home
ALN Archives

ABOUT TERRY TEACHOUT
AND OUR GIRL IN CHICAGO

Terry lives in Manhattan. He's the drama critic of the Wall Street Journal and the music critic of Commentary, but he writes about... More


ABOUT "ABOUT LAST NIGHT"
This is a blog about the arts in New York City and elsewhere, a diary of Terry's life as a working critic, with additional remarks and reflections by Laura Demanski (otherwise known as Our Girl in Chicago), who is also, among other things, a critic. It’s about all the arts, not just one or two... More


ABOUT TERRY'S BOOKS
Terry's latest book is All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine... More

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(syndicate this AJblog)

TEACHOUT IN COMMENTARY

THE BEATLES NOW
“The Beatles were the first rock-and-roll musicians to be written about as musicians. Elvis Presley, for instance, had attracted vast amounts of attention from the press, but for the most part he was treated as a mass-culture phenomenon rather than as an artist, and so were the other rock musicians of the 50’s and early 60’s (and the swing-era band-leaders and vocalists who came before them). Not so the Beatles…” More

SECOND CITY

OCTOBER
"Terry Teachout, author of 'All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine,' 'A Terry Teachout Reader' and 'The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken,' started writing 'Second City,' a monthly column about the arts in New York, in the fall of 1999. In September, after six years and 64 columns, he filed his final report for The Post. 'I can't even begin to tell you how much I'll miss Second City,' he says. 'Not only was it a pleasure and a privilege to report to the readers of one great city about the artistic doings of another, but I learned to love Washington along the way.'...
More

SEPTEMBER
"It's profoundly unsettling for a Manhattanite to be following the news these days. I've found it all but impossible to tear myself away from the televised scenes of mounting chaos in New Orleans and on the Gulf Coast, though I did take a quick look the other day at the first 'Second City' column I filed after 9/11. It started like this: 'We're all right, thanks. It took a week or two for us to pull ourselves together, but New Yorkers have finally started to emerge from their holes, looking for all that art offers in times of trial: inspiration, diversion, catharsis, escape.' It will take a lot longer for the victims of Hurricane Katrina to reconstitute their lives, and longer still, I fear, for them to regain access to the solace of art..." More

AUGUST
“Respighi is known in this country for 'The Fountains of Rome', 'The Pines of Rome' and not much else, but in Italy he's rightly admired as a witty, wonderfully lyrical composer. 'La Bella Dormente' is all that and more, and Basil Twist's magical staging commingles singers, puppets and puppeteers to tell the familiar tale (at the end they all dance together, in a breathtaking piece of theatrical wizardry). The puppets were bewitchingly characterful, the singers first-rate. How sad to think that this show received only a half-dozen performances! It belongs in an off-Broadway theater, where it would surely run until the end of time…” More

TEACHOUT'S TOP FIVE

A list of things we've liked (subject to unexpected and wildly capricious updating).

To purchase or investigate, click on the link.


  • DVD: Metropolitan. Whit Stillman’s 1990 film debut, now on DVD (at last!) in a full-featured Criterion Collection version complete with outtakes, deleted scenes, and commentaries by Stillman, Luc Sante, and cast members Chris Eigeman and Taylor Nichols, who play the priggish preppies who take an insufficiently monied Upper West Sider under their wing and introduce him to the mysterious world of the urban haute bourgeoisie. The quintessential early-Nineties indie flick, still perfect sixteen years later (TT).

  • BOOK: G. Edmund White, Oliver Wendell Holmes (Oxford, $17.95, out Feb. 28). A pellucid brief life of the legendary Supreme Court justice who read Proust (and Nero Wolfe), knew (and disliked) Theodore Roosevelt and Henry James, was shot three times in the Civil War, sat on the bench until he turned ninety, and wrote like a writer, not a lawyer. The best first book for anyone who wants to know why Justice Holmes still matters (TT).

  • CD: Rosanne Cash, Black Cadillac (Capitol). Achingly sorrowful musical reflections on the deaths of two parents and a step-parent—two of whom just happened to be famous. If you’ve seen Walk the Line (and you should), Black Cadillac will have special resonance, but Johnny Cash’s greatly gifted daughter long ago moved beyond the compass of country music to carve out a spot for herself as one of our best singer-songwriters, regardless of genre. This is her strongest album yet (TT).

  • BOOK: Brian Priestley, Chasin’ the Bird: The Life and Legacy of Charlie Parker (Oxford, $28). A readable, musically aware short treatment of one of the saddest and most significant lives in the history of jazz. Until a full-scale primary-source biography of the self-destructive saxophonist is finally written, this is a good place to start (TT).

  • CD: Sweeney Todd (Nonesuch, two CDs). The original-cast album of John Doyle’s current Broadway revival of Stephen Sondheim’s masterpiece, in which the instrument-playing cast members double as the onstage orchestra. Michael Cerveris and Patti LuPone are formidable, and Sarah Travis’ ingenious chamber-orchestra reorchestration of Sondheim’s score is surprisingly effective, though by no means a substitute for Jonathan Tunick’s 1979 full-orchestra version, which remains available on CD. That one’s better, but this one is far more than a mere souvenir (TT).
  • More on the Top Five


TEACHOUT ELSEWHERE

KIRK DOUGLAS, MASTER PAINTER
“A wise old cynic once observed that hypocrisy is the tribute vice pays to virtue. Had he lived three centuries later, La Rochefoucauld might have added that biopics are the tribute Hollywood pays to real art. Anyone who chooses to make a movie about a great artist, be it good or bad, is making an implicit declaration of faith in the enduring significance of Western culture. Hence it says something of interest about the state of American culture that pictures like Lust for Life and The Agony and the Ecstasy, in which Charlton Heston played Michelangelo, have become so rare in recent years…” More

A HUNDRED BOOKS IN YOUR POCKET
"The e-book is back. So are the technophobes who swear it'll never catch on. They were right last time, and they might be right this time, too. Sooner or later, though, they'll be wrong—and when they are, your life will change..." More

MENCKEN NO. 3
“You don’t pour years of your life into writing a biography unless you feel an initial bond of sympathy with the subject, and, though many a biographer has grown disillusioned along the way, it’s obvious from reading Mencken: The American Iconoclast that Rodgers still admires and, just as important, likes the man about whom she has written. But how closely does that man resemble the real H.L. Mencken? Have Rodgers’s sympathies led her to smooth his rough edges, or downplay less palatable aspects of Mencken’s work that might not sit well alongside her frank admiration? The answer, I suspect, will depend on how much you yourself like Mencken…” More

SITES TO SEE

* = newly added

LITBLOGS
Beatrice
Beiderbecke Affair*
The Bibliothecary*
Bookdwarf
Books, Inq.
Bookslut
Brandywine Books
Chekhov's Mistress
Chicken Spaghetti
Conversational Reading
Brenda Coulter
Elegant Variation
emdashes
Galley Cat
Golden Rule Jones
Happy Booker
Light Reading
Litblog Co-Op
Literary Saloon
MadInkBeard
James Marcus
Scott McLemee
Metaxucafe
The Millions
MoorishGirl
The Mumpsimus
Maud Newton
Old Hag
People of the Book*
Rake's Progress
Reading Experience
Return of Reluctant
Tingle Alley
Sarah Weinman
Dan Wickett

OMNIBLOGS
Back with Interest
Coudal Partners
Cue Sheet
CultureSpace
DevraDoWrite
A Glass of Chianti
Gurgling Cod
Ionarts
Jerry Jazz Musician
Killin' time being lazy
Justine Larbalestier
Mixolydian Mode
My Stupid Dog
news from me
Outer Life
Praise of Folly
Pratie Place
Purveyor*
Quiet Bubble
Searchblog
S/FJ
Shaken & Stirred
Something Old
such stuff
Sweet Dissonance
James Tata
Teatro Lifson*
Thrilling Days
Topic Drift
Kelly Jane Torrance
Eve Tushnet
2 Blowhards
Wax Banks

SCHOOLBLOGS
Critical Mass
Household Opera
The Little Professor
Amardeep Singh

SCREENBLOGS
Michael Barrier
DVD Savant
Girish
davekehr.com
Pullquote
Video WatchBlog*

SIGHTBLOGS
Artblog.net
Design Observer*
Eye Level*
From the Floor
Gallery Hopper*
Modern Art Notes
Modern Kicks
Edward Winkleman*

SOUNDBLOGS
Canadienne
The Concert*
Deceptively Simple
Do the Math
Jessica Duchen
The Fredösphere
in the wings
Iron Tongue
JazzPortraits*
Night After Night
oboeinsight
Rifftides
Alex Ross
Sandow
Sequenza21*
Sounds Like Now
Think Denk
twang twang twang

STAGEBLOGS
Downtown Dancer
Footnotes
On Theatre/Politics*
Parabasis
The Playgoer
Superfluities
Theatre Ideas
The Wicked Stage*
zayamsbury.net*

______________


WEBCOMICS
Cat and Girl

______________


ARTISTS
BiddyBlog
Bob Brookmeyer
Mary Foster Conklin
Makoto Fujimura
Greta Gertler
Hilary Hahn
Jim Hall
Fred Hersch
Laura Lippman
Erin McKeown
Beata Moon
Paul Moravec
Nickel Creek
Maria Schneider
Luciana Souza

CRITICS
Bruce Bawer
Roger Ebert
Robert Gottlieb
Maureen Mullarkey
Mark Steyn

ART LINKS
artsjournal.com
Arts & Letters Daily
Ballet.co Dance Links
CBC Arts
The Page

______________


OTHER BLOGS
Alicublog
Althouse
The American Scene
Barone Blog
Eric Berlin
Bookish Gardener
Cathy's World
Chequer-Board
City Comforts
Colby Cosh
The Corner
Crescat Sententia
Clive Davis
Delicious Pundit
First Things
Godsbody
Hotline Blogometer
InstaPundit
Kausfiles
Lileks
Lileks Screeds
Maccers
Lance Mannion
Megan McArdle
Modestly Yours
Off Wing Opinion
Open Book
Overheard Lines
Overlawyered
Political Animal
RealClearPolitics
Roger L. Simon
songs for frogs
Michael Yon

______________


MEDIA/GOSSIP
BuzzMachine
Gawker
I Want Media
Memeorandum
PressThink
Regret the Error*
Romenesko
TMFTML

RADIO
Hello Beautiful!
Saint Paul Sunday
Soundcheck
Studio 360

PRINT
Armavirumque
Baltsun Books
Bosglobe Books
Bosglobe Music
Bosglobe Theater
Chitrib Arts

Chitrib Books
Commentary
LAT Books
NY Observer Arts
NYT Arts
NYT Blogs 101
NYT Book Review
NYT Obits
NYT Theater
The Onion
Slate
The Spectator*
WSJ OpinionJournal*
DC Post Bookworld
DC Post Style
DC Post Sunday Arts

______________


USEFUL SITES
Am Art Oral Histories
Artcyclopedia
BBC Four Interviews
Berlioz Website
Bixography
Bloggers' Legal Guide
Criterion Collection
Currency Calculator
DVD Journal
Greatest Films
Hot Dogs
Inflation Calculator
Internet Movie DB
Internet B'way DB
Henry James Sites
Jazz on Line*
Masters of Cinema
Morandi JPEGs
Online Parallel Bible
OS Shakespeare
Opus 1 Classical
Paris Review DNA
Red Hot Jazz
Rep. Poetry On-line
Rotten Tomatoes
samueljohnson.com
snopes.com
TV Shows on DVD
Upcoming Jazz CDs
Worlds Records

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